MATH 111 : Applied Calculus I (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: MATH 012

This course covers functions and graphs, specific functions and their applications as models (Linear, quadratic, rational, exponential and logarithmic , Limits, continuity and differentiability of functions of a single variable . Applications: related rates, local linear approximation, differentials, curve sketching, applied optimization problems.

MATH 112 : Applied Calculus II (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: MATH 111

This course covers techniques of integration; infinite series, convergence tests; differentiation and integration of functions of several variables; maxima and minima, optimization, introduction to ordinary differential equations, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

MATH 121 : Applied Mathematics for Architecture (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: MATH 002

This course is specially designed for architecture and interior architecture students. It covers selected topics in basic algebra, geometry; solving equations: linear and quadratic; trigonometry: laws of cosines and sines; vectors; and analytic geometry.

MATH 101 : Calculus I (4-0-4)

Prerequisites: MATH 002

To introduce the student to the basic concepts and methods of Calculus, topics include: Limits, continuity and differentiability of functions of a single variable (exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions). Applications: related rates, local linear approximation, differentials, hyperbolic functions, curve sketching and applied optimization problems.

MATH 102 : Calculus II (4-0-4)

Prerequisites: MATH 101

Definite and indefinite integrals of functions of a single variable. Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Techniques of integration. Applications of the definite integral to area, volume, arc length and surface of revolution. Improper integrals. Sequences and series: convergence tests, integral, comparison, ratio and root tests. Alternating series, absolute and conditional convergence. Power series. Taylor and Maclaurin series.

MATH 201 : Differential Equations (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: MATH 102

The goal for this course is to learn and understand topics, including, first order differential equations, higher order linear differential equations, first order systems, linear systems, force and resonance, and Laplace transforms.

MATH 202: CALCULUS III (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: MATH 102

The goal for the semester is to learn and understand topics including, but not limited to, vectors and the geometry of space, vector-valued functions and motion in space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and integration in vector fields.

MATH 204 : Linear Algebra (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: MATH 102

The goal for this course is to learn and understand topic including linear equations, matrix algebra, vector spaces, eigenvectors, orthogonality and least squares, symmetric matrices and quadratic forms.

MATH 301 : Advanced Mathematics for electrical Engineering (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: MATH 102

This course covers vector spaces and subspaces. Linear independence, basis and dimension. Solution of linear equations. Orthogonality. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Vector calculus including vector fields, gradient, divergence, curl, line and surface integrals, Green’s theorem, Gauss’ and Stokes’ theorems. Introduction to complex variables.

MATH 303 : Numerical Methods (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: MATH 102

Floating-point arithmetic and error analysis. Solution of non-linear equations. Polynomial interpolation. Numerical integration and differentiation. Data fitting. Solution of linear and non linear algebraic systems. Initial and boundary value problems of ordinary differential equations.

STAT 211 : Statistics for Business I (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: MATH 112

This course covers Basics of Probability and statistics to business students. Emphasizes the understanding of the nature of randomness of real world problems, and the formulation of statistical methods using arguments and thereby make meaningful decisions.

STAT 232 : Probability and Statistics (3-0-3)

Prerequisites:

This course covers Basics of Probability and statistics designed for computer science and computer engineering students. Some of the main topics are random processes and data. Applications and background for topics in reliability, inventory systems, queuing problems, including absolute and conditional probabilities, discrete and continuous random variables, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing.

STAT 311 : Statistics for Business II (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: STAT 211

Introducing basic concepts of probability and statistics to business students. Emphasis will be given on the understanding of the nature of randomness of real world problems, the formulation of statistical methods by using intuitive arguments and thereby making meaningful decisions.

STAT 342 : Probability and Statistics for Engineers (3-0-3)

Prerequisites:

Introduce the basic concepts of probability and statistics to engineering students. Emphasis will be given on the understanding of the nature of randomness of real world phenomena; the formulation of statistical methods by using intuitive arguments, solving them and thereby making meaningful decisions.

PHYS 101 : General Physics I (3-3-4)

Prerequisites: MATH 002

Basic principles of physics are introduced. The topics covered include particle kinematics and dynamics; Newton laws, conservation of energy and linear momentum; rotational kinematics; rigid body dynamics; conservation of angular momentum; Gravitation; simple harmonic motion; the static and dynamics of fluids. The course material will be presented in lectures (3 hrs./week). Problem solving techniques will be shown in tutorials (1 hr./ week). The understanding of concepts will further be strengthened by laboratory work (3 hrs/ week).

PHYS 102 : General Physics II (3-3-4)

Prerequisites: PHYS 101

This course is a continuation of PHYS 101. Topics covered include: wave motion and sound; temperature, first and second law of thermodynamics; kinetic theory of gases Coulomb’s law; the electric field; Gauss’ law; electric potential; capacitors and dielectrics; D.C. circuits; the magnetic field; Ampere’s and Faraday’s; The course material will be presented in lectures (3 hrs./week). Problem solving techniques will be shown in tutorials (1 hr./ week). The understanding of concepts will further be strengthened by laboratory work (3 hrs/ week).

PHYS 122 : Applied Physics for Architecture (2-2-3)

Prerequisites: MATH 121

It is a basic course of physics fundamental laws and principles with emphasis on the application of physical principles to the problems of architecture and interior architecture. It covers several topics as mechanics and dynamics; work, energy and power; electrostatics and electricity; temperature, heat transfer and laws of thermodynamics; light; Acoustics. The course is structured based on soft-numerical teaching methods. The course material will be presented in lectures (2 hrs./week). Problem solving techniques will be shown in tutorials (1 hr./ week). The understanding of theoretical concepts will further be strengthened by laboratory work at a rate of (2 hrs/ week).

PHSC 113 : Conceptual Physical Sciences (3-3-4)

Prerequisites:

This course is designed to introduce business students, with non-scientific background, to the concepts and practical applications of the physical sciences, so that students get acquainted with the increasingly science and technology modern life. Introduction to basic concepts of Physics and Chemistry with selected topics from Earth Science will be covered. Topics will include measurement, motion, Newton's laws of motion, momentum, energy, work, power, heat, waves, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and atoms and periodic table of element and the formation of the earth and universe. There will be several demonstrations and lab experiments that will enforce the student learning during the semester.

CHEM 101 : General Chemistry (3-3-4)

Prerequisites:

The course is designed to give students a foundation in chemistry by providing an introduction to the following areas: atomic theory; physical and chemical properties of gases, liquids, solids, and their solutions; properties of some elements and their compounds, etc. The course laboratory will include some qualitative and quantitative measurements to formulate and analyze chemical reactions. The course material will be presented in lectures (3 hrs./week).The understanding of concepts will further be strengthened by laboratory work (3 hrs/ week).

ENGL 101 : An Introduction to Academic Discourse (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: ENGL 004

English 101 is an intensive course (45 contact hours spread over a fifteen-week semester) in reading and writing English focusing on the language skills needed for success in college courses. The focus of this class is on developing fluency in academic reading and writing: “read well to write well”.

Students are exposed to different genres of reading material such as encyclopedias, magazines, newspapers and websites. They are taught strategies for dealing with each genre independently and effectively. The writing component teaches argumentation and such rhetorical modes as definition writing, description, exemplification, causal analysis and comparison. Students are taught the writing process and introduced to paragraphing, cohesion, conciseness, unity and the use of specific details. They are alerted to common errors in grammar and sentence structure. The vocabulary component is based on the Academic World List, a corpus of vocabulary items based on the most frequently occurring lexis in a broad range of academic texts. In addition, students are expected to give short talks on a variety of topics.

ENGL 102 : An Introduction to Report Writing (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: ENGL 101

Students write a term report on a themed topic. They are introduced to basic research skills involving the Internet and the University’s databases and print collections. They are taught about document design, the MLA (Modern Language Association) style of documentation, evaluating sources, summarizing, outlining, note taking, drafting, revising and editing. Academic integrity in report writing is strongly emphasized. Their reading skills are further enhanced through exposure to a variety of graphical sources such as charts, graphs and diagrams. Students are taught presentation skills culminating in a PowerPoint presentation based on their term report.

The ENGL 102 course explores then three common academic rhetorical modes: summary and critique, analysis, discussion synthesis and report writing. Students will learn the purpose and key elements of each, and practice writing, evaluating, and revising. Students will also learn techniques for introducing, developing, and concluding their productions and term reports and present it verbally. These three modes are going to be based on selected reading themes assigned by the teacher, as well as related vocabulary.

ENGL 201 : Technical Communication (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: 102

The ultimate goal of Technical Communication is to enhance students’ reading, writing, oral and electronic skills in order for them to become able to effectively communicate in English. The course comprises leading research, organization of collected information and writing audience-centered technical reports and correspondence documents as well as preparing oral presentations of their reports. The current course will also enable students to develop skills of collaborative work. It will help students build effective abilities to compose various types of business correspondence such as memos, emails, and business letters. The course then will provide them with significant opportunities to effectively function not only in the academic environment but also in their future professional environment.

ENGL 111 : English Language I (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: None

This is an upper intermediate to advanced undergraduate level course that focuses on developing students’ skills for standardized English examinations. It combines modern classroom practice with interesting topics aimed at freshman year students. This program prepares participants for all parts of the IELTS exam – Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking modules. It focuses on the skills and techniques which are required to sit the test and assists students to familiarize themselves with the various test formats and test taking strategies. Undergraduates will practice different language tasks through a variety of academic orientated activities and assignments.

By the end of the course students are expected to score a minimum IELTS Band 5. It is a fifteen week course with five hours of instruction per week.

ENGL 112 : English Language II (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: None

This is an upper intermediate to advanced undergraduate level course that continues to build upon skills and techniques from English Proficiency Course 111. It focuses on developing students’ skills for examination practice and combines modern classroom practice with interesting topics aimed at freshman year students. This program prepares participants for all parts of the IELTS exam – Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking modules. The course assist students to develop the skills and techniques required to sit the test and familiarizes them with the various test formats and test taking strategies. Undergraduates will practice different language tasks through a variety of academic orientated activities and assignments.

By the end of the course, participants are expected to score a minimum IELTS Band 5. It is a fifteen-week course with five hours of instruction per week.